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What to learn from Japanese Corporate Culture?

As we are very much aware  that our country is a developing, to convert into the developed one we need to improvise our working  environment so that it will be fruitful for our revenue generations.

DAFTAR INDIA provides good working environment with all the facilities in which employees will focus and get attracted towards the work. Let me share my experience with my Japanese person.

I have had close relationships with the Japanese managers assigned to me and with those to whom I reported in Japan. I have seen how they manage their own people,

American employees, customers and vendors, and the external marketplace. I’ve heard the president of Toshiba America say, as we discussed some problems with product quality, “This is not Japanese quality.” And I’ve heard Japanese managers say, when talking about problems with an American employee,

“We must help this person overcome his weaknesses.”

 

Better to focus on the weakness of  a person rather than ditching or make fun of them.

Every individual is unique in his/her own way. Better to understand the circumstance and to keep focusing on there dignified  work with full of patience and perseverance.

If we talk about budget, Of course, budgets are also a planning tool. If the budget becomes meaningless during the course of the year, the company is like a ship without a rudder. And if you’re running a company with several divisions, the effect is cumulative.

Fix the problem, not the blame

DAFTAR INDIA believes rather than blaming everyone and keep criticizing in some what another way.

We should have to find out the problems and better to fix it.

Let us consider the experience of Japan. What stands out in Japanese history, as well as in today’s Japanese management behaviour, is the capacity for making 180-degree turns—that is, for reaching radical and highly controversial decisions. Let me illustrate:

Toyo Rayon, the largest Japanese manufacturer of man-made fibers, made nothing but rayon as late as the mid-1950’s. Then it decided to switch to synthetic fibers. But it did not “phase out” rayon making, as every Western company in a similar situation has done. Instead, it closed its rayon mills overnight, even though, under the Japanese system of employment, it could not lay off a single man.

 

 

Focusing on the problem

The key to this apparent contradiction is that the Westerner and the Japanese mean something different when they talk of “making a decision.”

With us in the West, all the emphasis is on the answer to the question. Indeed, our books on decision making try to develop systematic approaches to giving an answer.

To the Japanese, however, the important element in decision making is defining the question.

The important and crucial steps are to decide whether there is a need for a decision and what the decision is about.

And it is in this step that the Japanese aim at attaining “consensus.”

Indeed, it is this step that, to the Japanese, is the essence of the decision.

The answer to the question (what the West considers the decision) follows its definition.

All of this takes a long time, of course. The Westerner dealing with the Japanese is thoroughly frustrated during the process.

He does not understand what is going on. He has the feeling that he is being given the run around.

Increased effectiveness

What are the advantages of this process?

And what can we learn from it?

As we are very much aware  that our country is a developing, to convert into the developed one we need to improvise our working  environment so that it will be fruitful for our revenue generations.

DAFTAR INDIA provides good working environment with all the facilities in which employees will focus and get attracted towards the work. Let me share my experience with my Japanese person.

I have had close relationships with the Japanese managers assigned to me and with those to whom I reported in Japan. I have seen how they manage their own people,

American employees, customers and vendors, and the external marketplace. I’ve heard the president of Toshiba America say, as we discussed some problems with product quality, “This is not Japanese quality.” And I’ve heard Japanese managers say, when talking about problems with an American employee,

“We must help this person overcome his weaknesses.”

 

Better to focus on the weakness of  a person rather than ditching or make fun of them.

Every individual is unique in his/her own way. Better to understand the circumstance and to keep focusing on there dignified  work with full of patience and perseverance.

If we talk about budget, Of course, budgets are also a planning tool. If the budget becomes meaningless during the course of the year, the company is like a ship without a rudder. And if you’re running a company with several divisions, the effect is cumulative.

Fix the problem, not the blame

DAFTAR INDIA believes rather than blaming everyone and keep criticizing in some what another way.

We should have to find out the problems and better to fix it.

Let us consider the experience of Japan. What stands out in Japanese history, as well as in today’s Japanese management behaviour, is the capacity for making 180-degree turns—that is, for reaching radical and highly controversial decisions. Let me illustrate:

Toyo Rayon, the largest Japanese manufacturer of man-made fibers, made nothing but rayon as late as the mid-1950’s. Then it decided to switch to synthetic fibers. But it did not “phase out” rayon making, as every Western company in a similar situation has done. Instead, it closed its rayon mills overnight, even though, under the Japanese system of employment, it could not lay off a single man.

 

 

Focusing on the problem

The key to this apparent contradiction is that the Westerner and the Japanese mean something different when they talk of “making a decision.”

With us in the West, all the emphasis is on the answer to the question. Indeed, our books on decision making try to develop systematic approaches to giving an answer.

To the Japanese, however, the important element in decision making is defining the question.

The important and crucial steps are to decide whether there is a need for a decision and what the decision is about.

And it is in this step that the Japanese aim at attaining “consensus.”

Indeed, it is this step that, to the Japanese, is the essence of the decision.

The answer to the question (what the West considers the decision) follows its definition.

All of this takes a long time, of course. The Westerner dealing with the Japanese is thoroughly frustrated during the process.

He does not understand what is going on. He has the feeling that he is being given the run around.

Increased effectiveness
What are the advantages of this process?

And what can we learn from it?

DAFTAR INDIA, it makes for very effective decisions. While it takes much longer in Japan to reach a decision than it takes in the West, from that point on they do better than we do.

After making a decision, we in the West must spend much time “selling” it and getting people to act on it.

Only too often, as all of us know, either the decision is sabotaged by the organization or, what may be worse, it takes so long to make the decision truly effective that it becomes obsolete, if not outright wrong, by the time the people in the organization actually make it operational.

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